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Tips to reduce anxiety

Here are some tips to help your child with anxiety.

1) Focus on the positive– Many times anxious and stressed children can get lost in negative thoughts and self-criticism. They may focus on how the glass is half empty instead of half-full and worry about future events. The more that you are able to focus on your child’s positive attributes and the good aspects of a situation, the more that it will remind your child to focus on the positives.

2) Schedule relaxing activities– Children need time to relax and be kids. Unfortunately, sometimes even fun activities, like sports, can become more about success than they are about fun.  Instead, it is important to ensure that your child engages in play purely for the sake of fun. This may include scheduling time each day for your child to play with toys, play a game, play a sport (without it being competitive), doing yoga, paint, have a tea party, put on a play, or just be silly.

3) Practice relaxation exercises with your child– Sometimes really basic relaxation exercises are necessary to help your child to reduce their stress and anxiety. This might mean telling your child to take a few slow, deep breaths (and you taking a few slow breaths with your child so your child can match your pace). Or it might mean asking your child to image him or herself somewhere relaxing, like the beach or relaxing in a backyard hammock. Ask your child to close his/her eyes and imagine the sounds, smells, and sensations associated with the image. For example, close your eyes and picture yourself on a beach. Listen to the sound of the surf as the waves come in and go out.  In and out. Listen to the sound of the seagulls flying off in the distance. Now focus on the feel of the warm sand beneath your fingers and the sun warming your skin.Your child can do these techniques on his or her own during anxiety-provoking times.

4) Encourage your child to express his/her anxiety– If your child says that he or she is worried or scared, don’t say “No you’re not!” or “You’re fine.”  That doesn’t help your child.  Instead, it is likely to make your child believe that you do not listern or do not understand him/her.  Insead, validate your child’s experience and then have a discussion about your child’s emotions and fears.

5) Help your child to problem solve– Once you have validated your child’s emotions and demonstrated that you understand your child’s experience and are listening to what your child has to say, help your child to problem solve.  This does not mean solving the problem for your child.  It means helping your child to identify possible solutions. If your child can generate solutions, that is great.  If not, generate some potential solutions for your child and ask your child to pick the solution that he or she thinks would work best.

 

 

Resources- https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/dont-worry-mom/201302/12-tips-reduce-your-childs-stress-and-anxiety