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Social Thinking With Michelle Garcia Winner

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Product Description

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When: 2nd & 3rd September 2016

Where: Mont Kiara International School

Time: 9am – 5pm (two coffee breaks and lunch will be provided)

Conference Fees: †RM680 per person (per day) / *RM600 per person (per day) †RM1260 per person (both days) / *RM 1100 (both days)

* Early Bird discount applies to registrations paid prior to 1 August 2016.

† Group discount on 3 or more places, conditions apply.

About the Speaker

Michelle Garcia Winner, MA, CCC-SLP. is the founder of Social Thinking® which specializes in developing treatment strategies for helping persons with social cognitive learning challenges. She runs and works in her clinic, has authored numerous books and speaks internationally. She was awarded a Congressional Certificate of Special Recognition in 2008.

Day 1: Thinking About YOU Thinking About ME (kinder – young adult)

We answer the question: What are a person’s core social learning challenges and how can we help? Improve your understanding of an individual’s social mind using the Social Thinking Social Communication Profile. With the help of video clips we uncover different levels of perspective taking, executive functioning and central coherence. Discover strategies to help each type of learner improve his or her social interpretation, social skills, reading comprehension and written expression. Learn about the Four Steps of Communication and how to use social media to teach its concepts. All information can strengthen treatment plans and can be used in the home, school and community.

What You Will Learn

  1. Define what “perspective taking” means and how it impacts academic learning as well as social communication.
  2. Define at least four different levels of the Social Thinking-Social Communication Profile.
  3. Explain why some treatment programs work for a particular level of ST-SCP functioning and are not as effective with another functioning level.
  4. Explain why social observation is critical for interpreting language.
  5. List the four steps involved in developing social communication skills.
  6. Describe a treatment activity that aligns with each of the four steps above.

Intended Audiences

Teachers; speech-language pathologists; therapists (MFTs, LCSWs, OTs, PTs); autism specialists; clinical, educational, developmental psychologists; clinical and educational administrators; physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, particularly those in the developmental practice; social workers; paraprofessionals; parents and other family members; and caregivers of individuals with social learning challenges.

Populations to be discussed

Kindergarteners through young adults who have social and communication difficulties, including but not limited to those related to high-functioning autism spectrum disorders, PDD-NOS, Asperger Syndrome, NLD, ADHD, twice exceptional, murky undiagnosed challenges, etc. Information presented focuses on individuals with near normal to far above normal verbal intelligence (verbal IQs above 70).
Most strategies focus on school-age children and adults, although the information is helpful for those living and working with younger children.

Full Description

Ever wondered how most people can intuitively “read” other people and make split-second decisions about how to interact with them? The process of social communication requires perspective taking. Perspective taking is not one thing but requires many things to happen at once, including conceptual processing (central coherence), figuring out the gist of the situation (executive functioning), and considering the thoughts and emotions of oneself as well as others (theory of mind). This workshop will explore how central these skills and others are to all social contact, nonverbal or verbal, intentional or unintentional. Audiences rave about this workshop day as being filled with research-based information while helping attendees better understand the specific social and academic needs of their students or children. The day starts with exploring the normal development of the social mind. We then move on to explore the different levels of social learning challenges and how they impact a person at school, at home, and into the adult years. In the afternoon, we will explore basic treatment concepts for our “higher functioning” clients, including the Four Steps of Communication and other practical treatment strategies. Clips from popular movies and TV shows will demonstrate how the media can be used to help teach social thinking and encourage social learning. To better understand the different levels of the social mind, we will present our newest information with our model, The Cascade of Social Attention. The Cascade helps us to better understand why individuals have different social learning abilities, even if they share the same diagnostic label.  We provide further information on this topic through a framework we have created called the Social Thinking-Social Communication Profile™ (ST-SCP), formerly known as the Spectrum of Perspective-Taking. The ST-SCP was developed based on years of clinical work focusing on more efficient and effective treatments to help students evolve in their social thinking abilities. Four of the seven levels defined in the ST-SCP will be reviewed during this conference day, illuminating how varying levels of social learning lead to different competencies – exposing why some treatments are more effective than others. As attendees better understand the social functioning of a particular individual, they can select the treatment best suited for the specific needs of that person. pIf our goal is to help others gain access to critical information they can use across their lives, it is essential that we move away from the idea that all persons with social learning challenges can benefit from the same treatment group or classroom. The ST-SCP not only facilitates a better understanding of an individual’s social and academic learning needs, it helps to define which individuals need to work on learning social rules versus which individuals need help with social nuance – and why this difference is essential. See why the number of buttons a student buttons on a shirt can guide our treatment practices! This is a fascinating day to explore how the little characteristics we notice in our students may be symptoms of a deeper social learning challenge.

 

Day 2: I’m going to be a video game designer!” Helping Teens Prepare for the Adult World (middle schoolers – young adults )

Transitioning into adulthood and living as a young adult can overwhelm an individual born to social learning challenges. This workshop helps parents and professionals prepare their teens for life outside of the regimented school day. Learn how to strengthen social, vocational, and life skills. Explore strategies to manage anxiety and encourage more nuanced perspective taking, responsibility, and self-awareness. The content presented is based on research as well as years of experience working with teens and adults.

What You Will Learn

  1. Describe how the ILAUGH model is relevant for issues involved in the transition to adulthood, such as university or job skill success.
  2. Explain a “realistic transition plan” and name three items to focus on during transition planning.
  3. Create a lesson to teach students to evaluate their motivation and become accountable for applying what they have learned in other settings.
  4. Explain how anxiety can be a “stop sign” in an individual’s ability to use social thinking and related skills.
  5. Explain a way to teach students to graph their “good” job skills, including being accurate and productive, in addition to social thinking skills.
  6. Explain how a student can learn to identify and prioritize his or her own treatment goals.

Intended Audiences

Teachers; speech-language pathologists; therapists (MFTs, LCSWs, OTs, PTs); autism specialists; clinical, educational, developmental psychologists; clinical and educational administrators; physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, particularly those in the developmental practice; social workers; paraprofessionals; parents and other family members; and caregivers of individuals with social learning challenges.

Populations to be discussed

Middle schoolers through young adults who have social and communication difficulties, including but not limited to those related to high-functioning autism spectrum disorders, PDD-NOS, Asperger Syndrome, NLD, ADHD, twice exceptional, murky undiagnosed challenges, etc. Information presented focuses on individuals with near normal to far above normal verbal intelligence (verbal IQs above 70).

Full Description

Transitioning into adulthood can overwhelm individuals born to social learning challenges, even those who are “bright” with strong language skills. This conference day focuses on helping parents, professionals and individuals undergo this transition. It is important that both adults and teens begin to consider a plan for the transition into adulthood while the individual is in middle school. By providing concrete ways to develop a realistic transition plan, we help teens and their parents prepare for life outside the more regimented schedule of the school day. We will explore how the world becomes more nuanced as we age, and strategies to help individuals develop a more mature Social Thinking mindset – including an “I can do this” and “I need to do this” attitude. We will review concrete strategies to teach teens about the concepts of responsibility, motivation, and anxiety management; and discuss ideas they can use in forming a range of friendships. Ultimately, we want to help students learn to be more comfortable with the fact they are going to be increasingly uncomfortable with the demands of young adulthood. We will conclude with practical lessons for promoting productivity, accuracy, and social-emotional problem solving in vocational environments. Prior to attending this conference day, please read a blog written by Michelle Garcia Winner and a parent of an adult with social communication challenges: Adults: Becoming the Directors of Their Own Treatment Teams and Treatment Plans.

Terms and Conditions

  1. Please register early to avoid disappointment.
  2. There will be no refunds for cancellations; however paid seats are transferable with written consent.
  3. Should the event be cancelled, a full refund will be given.